NOVEMBER 2020
Recent art direction work for Optimum, a co-working space in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Optimum is more than just a place to work, but a whole mind-body experience, where you can work, eat and play, This project was through my client StellaPop in Reston, Virginia. StellaPop is a business management consulting firm helping improve operations, people and brand through marketing and creative strategies
Optimum magazine ad art direction
NOVEMBER 2020
November is here. Take some time, and get outside to enjoy the fall colours and cool crisp air.
November is the 11th month.
OCTOBER 2020
Fall is once again upon us. It's a beautiful time of the year, and I hope you can get outside for a walk to clear your mind about Covid-19.
Fall 2020 colours
SEPT 2020
Why hiring a freelancer is a great idea!
Freelancers have 100X more experience in their field than any lifelong staffer.

Freelancers have to adapt to working with different clients all the time, think on their toes, know what it truly means to work on a deadline, and are incredible multitaskers as they're usually managing several clients at once. 

They also have had to run their own company, so they know the ins and outs of client relations, organization, and constantly staying up on trends.

Freelancers are an ASSET to any company, don't sleep on them. If you're wondering why they would want a full-time job if they're so experienced, it's because the economy is f#cked and they have a family, student loans, massive rent payments, etc, and their industry has been dead for 1/2 a year. Not because they couldn't hack it. 

AUG 2020
Co-op Advertising
Co–op advertising refers to an agreement between a manufacturer and a retailer to share advertising costs, while at the same time creating brand name awareness. A manufacturer (of brand name products), will create a co-op program for use by dealers, retailers or agents. This can help to offset your costs and extend your campaign.
Below is a ad for Livingspace which sells the mdf italia line. The ad still remains stylish and within brand.
July 2020
Fashion Designer Branding
Keep an eye on this space for a new area of design I will be involved with. I have been asked to develop a brand for a Vancouver fashion designer that had a successful brand in New York. The new brand will include an identity, business card and website.
June 2020
Branding With a Purpose
Times are changing. When choosing brands to do business with, today’s consumers care about more than just what products or services they offer—they care about what kind of impact brands are making in the world. And if you want to take your brand to the next level, you need a sense of purpose—a sense of purpose your audience truly connects to.
Your brand purpose can have a major impact on how your brand is viewed in the market—and, ultimately, can be the driving force behind your success.
But what, exactly, is brand purpose? Why is it so important? And how can you define, build, and market a brand purpose that feels true to who you are—and forges a real connection with your ideal customers in the process?
A rising generation of consumers is looking for brands to stand for something bigger than the products they sell,” says Bemporad. “They want brands to embody an inspiring ethos, bring a strong point of view, and take action to make a positive impact in the world.”
Your brand purpose is not your brand vision, mission, or values. Obviously, they’re related; each builds off the other. But if your vision, mission, and values are the building blocks of your brand, think of your brand purpose as the foundation.
“Your brand vision is where you are going. Your mission is how you will get there. And your values define how you will act along the way. They are all inward focused. They represent you talking about your brand. They are important to define, but none of them are as powerful as your purpose,” says Salva. “Your purpose—or Big Audacious Meaning—is the larger reason why you do what you do. It should sit above the vision, mission, and values, informing and guiding them. It is invaluable because it is outward focused—defining the difference you will make in a life, a community, or even the world. By clarifying your purpose, you help people understand how your brand serves them and their world. And it sets the stage for inviting them along to pursue the larger purpose you have clarified for your brand.”
The first step to discovering your brand purpose is defining your “why.” And the best way to do that? Asking yourself some deeper questions.
There are three key questions you need to ask yourself when defining your brand purpose:
What are you best at?
What are you passionate about?
What difference can you make?
MAY 2020
Returning Back to Work During the Covid-19 Pandemic
As we cautiously approach relaxing social distancing rules, with many people feel unsure as to the safety of returning back to the office, I would like to offer my services to graphic design studios, and advertising agencies as a reliable graphic designer or art director until your staff feel safe to return to the office. I have over 30 years of experience working remotely, and feel more than comfortable doing so. Working from home is not easy for many people because of distractions, so you need someone who is focused, and not bothered by distractions.
APRIL 2020
Design Exercise
From time-to-time I develop design exercises to explore and push concepts that eventually may be presented to a client for an idea they may not have considered in the past, or may consider in the future. The MEC concept ad is an exploration in using their acronym branded name MEC (Mountain Equipment Co-operative) in conjunction with their website URL, and use that same word to form a statement in the headline.
MEC is Canada's go-to place for outdoor gear, know-how and inspiration, MEC is a co- op owned by the people who shop there.
MEC advertising concept ad
APRIL 2020
Signal Auto Logo Design
A recent logo design completed for Skyrocket Digital. The identity for Signal Auto is a commercial fleet dealership in California. 
The arrow represents the right-turn signal light on a car dashboard, and also represents the arrow on a computer keyboard. The arrow is a metaphor for:
- Travel
- The future
- Forward movement or thinking
- A journey
- Career or business advancement
- Delivery of products or services
- Guidance
The logo is simple and clean, that represents a no-fuss way to search for vehicles online. While a vehicle search is being performed online, the triangle can blink o-and-on during the search function. This is also graphical representation of the signal light of the dashboard blinking when a vehicle performs a turn. Different font weights for “signal” and “auto” help to make each thought stand-out without extra space needed between each word.
Signal Auto Logo Identity
APRIL 2020
What Role Does Design Play in a Public Health Crisis?
Whether employed to warn or impart information about symptoms, prevention, and infection, graphic design plays a significant role in the front-line response to infectious disease, making life-saving messages accessible to all. Examples of this can be seen in the bold graphics used to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS in the 1980s and in the NGO campaigns during the 2014 and 2015 Ebola outbreak. 
March 2020
How to Slow the Spread of Misinformation
The door to misinformation opens the moment we try to infer about an entire population based only on a sample. And surprise! The data sets we rely on for insights and conclusions are only samples — subsets of the population. There will always be missing information and questions that go unanswered. Therefore, any study or article can potentially (and not necessarily intentionally) lead to miscommunication and misinformation.
Fortunately, you have the ability to control what information you digest and share with others. To begin, arm yourself with questions instead of assumptions. In the midst of this pandemic, we can stop the spread of misinformation by applying a sniff test to the information crossing our path. Use these questions to filter the noise when you come across a new piece of information — an article, a study, a social media post.
What is the intent of this study/article? Do the metrics used actually support the message of the study? In other words, are we measuring what we think we are measuring?
What is missing? What do we know that we don’t know? What do we wish we could find out? Is that information obtainable?
What other variables could be attributed to this outcome? Also, consider any other variables that might impact the changes in the input variables as well as the output variables.
Why is this information important? Why is this happening? Root-cause analysis doesn’t stop at the surface — keep digging by asking the next “why” question. This is the difference between addressing the symptoms vs. the real problems.
How is this metric/number obtained? Surveys? Random samples? Self-reported? An agency? Has the method of obtaining these metrics changed?
Are there road-blocks to reporting accurate figures? Could the challenges in collecting this data differ by country/region/state?
Are the numbers given in absolutes? Or percentages? Or, are they weighted values based on the distribution within subgroups? For example, are per capita measures considered? What about overall population distribution of a variable such as blood type — since O is less common than A, absolute counts are less helpful.
Does this graph hide information? Check each axis — are they truncated? Or does it have misaligned dual axes for two variables over the same X axis? (See below.)
9. Where did this study/article originate? Find the original study/experiment to look at the design, sample size, timing, source, etc.
10. Who funded this study? You might have to dig deep to get this answer. Or you may never know.
11. When was this data collected? Is it all equally relevant, or are we mixing old and new data?
12. Does this article/study predict for the future based on past data? If so, what model(s) are they using? How many input variables? Keep in mind we use MULTIPLE forecasting models for hurricanes! Human behavior is extremely variable and and even harder to predict than weather.
NOTE: Be cautious of EXTRAPOLATION — predicting beyond the range of known values.
13. Does the source/author offer some margin of error/level of uncertainty for their metrics and predictions? Be cautious of any source that implies 100% probability of some outcome. A better source is willing to say, “I’m not sure” or “60% of the time,” etc.
14. Does this information makes sense? We all have a little bit of common sense — use it.
15. Before sharing or posting an article: If someone came along and said, “Wanna bet?” would you wager that the article/study is accurate? A great decision-making strategy by Annie Duke.
Lastly, we are resilient. Together, we will turn our world back on course. And though it’s easy to capsize in the tides of perpetual information, take some time to unplug. Sometimes we all need to close the computer, turn off the television, and enjoy a well-worn novel.
February 2020
I recently spent time in Hong Kong during the Coronavirus, and the once vibrant city is very quiet. The virus has added to the malaise since the protest movement started six months ago. What I've noticed is, there is so much disinformation floating around, and people will believe anything they see or hear on the internet. It is very important to get your sources of information from trusted news sources that already filter the incorrect information. The virus will eventually peak and vanish from the radar, but the city will have to deal with the increase in the protest movement that may go on for years.
Hong Kongers wearing face masks during the COVID19 outbreak
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